Indian Pond Heron (Ardeola grayii)

Hey all the beautiful bird lovers, today is the 3rd episode of the series I have started naming “About the bird“. Though I am two days late to my weekly schedule of the series blog post due to some sudden official tour we had to make. So I am in one of those small and unknown places of our country where google also cant finds you out. 😀 So the best thing I can do here is to pack myself inside the hotel room and spend some time alone with my wordpress family. Its 38 degrees scorching heat outside and no point in going anywhere in search of wings because I am gonna get nothing here.Being staying here for already two days made me realize that what I have there in Goa,in our rented appartment, my balcony,beautiful mornings and silent nights. I miss waking up to bird chirps (especially my kingo’s alarm call and bubbly bulbul songs -I guess I have gained a beautiful habit in here).

PS- I call white throated kingfisher as my Kingo  (named actually by my bird enthusiast friend Leena, I stole it from her). I love calling him that. 😀

So lets get into today’s session .

[ HIGH BRIGHTNESS RECOMMENDED FOR BETTER IMAGE RESULTS ]

Indian Pond Heron (Ardeola grayii)

Indian Pond herons , commonly known as paddybird due to its occurrence in almost all the paddy fields and wetlands in India and east Asia. Scientifically called as Ardeola grayii, Pond herons are considered to be small in heron family. Sized almost medium and can be seen near water areas and also in urban areas now a days.

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Taking a usual perch and stays for sometime on the   same perch.                                                                      Exif:  f/6.3 |exposure: 1/100 sec |ISO:800 |   @500mm

One of the most widespread herons in India, they are known to be co-existing with humans as they choose to make their habitats(nests) along with urbanization (in cities and towns) though their wide variety of habitats includes rivers, lakes, marshes, mangroves, streams and paddy fields. I have seen quite a few of them here and there everywhere like construction buildings,damp houses , nearby busy roads besides natural habitats.They prefer to live in low lands but may also be found in higher altitudes like nilgiri hills which lie more than 2000m above sea level.

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Talking of urban civilization.     Exif:  f/6.3 |exposure: 1/640 sec |ISO:200 |

They weigh around 230 grams and sized around 40-45cm when  adult and large beautiful white wide span ranges around 70-90cm. Unlike their usual grey stripes, their wings looks bright white when they fly. They have short neck, short thick bill and greyish-brown back/feathers with greenish large legs and yellow eyes.

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Beautiful feather.  Exif:  f/6.3 |exposure: 1/60 sec |ISO:800 |

Usually Pond herons are silent in nature but they have a harsh croak when they call.

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Astonished! Exif:  f/6.3 |exposure: 1/160 sec |ISO:100 |   @600mm

Indian pond herons feed on small fish, frogs, crabs, aquatic insects, grasshoppers, crickets, ants, bees, fly, baby turtles, leeches and other crustaceans. They are very skilled killer. They silently stalks its prey by walking very slowly and waits for quite a while before they gets the chance to ambush. I like to call them “shatir dimag” in hindi (skilled and trained brain). Their usual feeding habitat is near the marshy wetlands. They usually feed on the edges of the pond/water body but they may sometimes swim to fish or catch fishes diving in while on a flight.

 

This guys are experts in camouflage when they are tracking a prey. They are so silent, one will easily miss one of  these being a real close. One moment you see nothing, the other moment, you see one fly away with a prey in a splash.

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Camouflage in marsh water .Exif:  f/7.1 |exposure: 1/640 sec |ISO:250 |

Their breeding season starts with the onset of monsoon mainly from may to september but they are also found to be breeding before may in southern India and sri lanka. They usually breed in small groups of same species ,sometimes with other herons too. They look admirable when breeding with white -grey plumage. Their feet changes its colour to yellow then red in some individuals.

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Indian Pond heron showing plumage colours.                       Exif:  f/6.3 |exposure: 1/800 sec |ISO:800 |   @600mm

Most nests are built at a height of about 9 to 10 m in large dense trees. The nest material is collected by the male while the female builds the nest like most other bird species.. Three to five eggs are laid that takes around 18 to 24 days to hatch. Both parents feed the young and take part in upbringing. They sometimes reuse old nests that were left untouched since last years.

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Close up of an Indian Pond heron. Exif: f/6.3  exposure: 1/640  ISO:200 @500mm

Recently talking about Indian pond heron with few of the locals I know in Goa, I came to know that few of the villagers in India used to make heron dishes like they have been used as fishes and boiler chickens to feed on. I was disheartened hearing that but was relaxed after knowing that Indian forest department is taking action against those who were hunting pond herons and other water birds.

Location: Goa, India

Gears used: Canon + Sigma

So this is it for today’s bird session people. I will see you all in my next blog. Till then happy birding. Stay blessed and share love.

Much love

Riya

 

Red Whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus)

Hello lovelies,

First of all, a very happy and warm new year wishes to all my bengali and punjabi friends( I belong to both the communities :D) May your life gets better each year. And for me,may this year brings more and more opportunities for photographing the most beautiful creations of God i.e. birds.

In my last week’s post, I have started a series on “About the bird” with my very first post on White throated kingfisher. If you haven’t read it yet, HERE’s the LINK.

So today’s post is on yet another one of the most beautiful yet common bird in India and outside.

Before we start, I want to share a little, very little, happiness of mine. There is a non profit organization called “Wild bird Trust” who runs a blog on behalf of National Geographic and shares “Top 25 birds of the week” ever week depending on the theme of that particular week. So last week’s theme was “The birds that were saved by MBTA (Migratory birds Treaty Act-1918)” and one of my images was selected in this week’s Top 25 birds. The selected image is of ‘Little Stint‘ that I clicked in Carambolim lake in Goa on 31st of march 2018. Have a look.

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Little Stint . Exif:  f/7.1  exposure-1/320 sec   ISO-100  @484mm

Feel free to have a look at the Top 25 birds by National Geographic for the 2nd week of April 2018. -> https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2018/04/13/top-25-mbta/

By now, you all must be knowing that I use my nick name ‘Riya Roy Pahuja’ as an alias for my photographs.

NOW, lets get back to business 😉 Today’s lesson.

Red Whiskered bulbul (Pycnonotus jocosus)

Red Whiskered bulbul or crested bulbul  (Scientific name – Pycnonotus jocosus) is a passerine bird found in Asia and one of the most common in bulbul (Pycnonotidae) family in western ghats (where I live). I can say this because I meet them every morning 🙂

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The beautiful perch.  Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/800sec   ISO-100  @600mm

Bulbul family has around 150 species ,out of which a very few are residents of India. Red whiskered bulbul sized around 20cm in length and considered as a medium sized bird. Not easily recognized from a very far distance but quite easily distinguishable from a little closer.

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 Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/640sec   ISO-320  @435mm

Unlike Yellow throated bulbul, which is the state bird of Goa, Red whiskered bulbuls have a beautiful black crown on their head and red face patch makes the beautiful cherry cheeks with white patch on lower ear-coverts bordered below by black moustachial stripe.

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 Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/500sec   ISO-500  @600mm

The upper body parts are almost brown with white under parts with a dark patch running onto the breast at shoulder level. They have not-so-curvy beaks, long tails (with terminal feather tips )and sharp feet that rolls around the tree branches making it easier for them to perch on almost everywhere and anywhere.

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The portrait.  Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/800sec   ISO-100  @600mm

They live for around 11 years. But they make sure they are heard till they die. Their very distinctive 3-4 note call “kink-a-joo” can be heard almost all the time when there is a red whiskered bulbul nearby. Their call has been described as “nice to meet you” at some places and their song is called the scolding chatter.

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Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/800sec   ISO-250  @600mm

They are mostly seen in groups of 2-4 and love to sit on the top of tree branches and call loud in the mornings(sometimes with other bulbul species too). They love to fly and change perch frequently but seems like never wanting to break the bond.

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The pair .   Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/800sec   ISO-800  @484mm

Red whiskered bulbuls feed on fruits, flower nectars and insects.

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Breakfast. Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/500sec   ISO-500  @600mm

This active species resides in lightly wooded areas, open forest, gardens, orchards, bushes around villages and cultivation. This particular bulbul is known to be a famous cage bird ( 😥 ) in south east Asia, once in India too ,but thankfully not any more.

[ My personal view : I don’t support caging of birds as they belong to wild and had been created by nature in such a way that they can adjust with the wildness of their habitat. Human interference only disturbs them. ]

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Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/800sec   ISO-320  @361mm

They breed once or twice in a year. Season includes december to may in southern India and march to october in northern India. Males usually bow their head, spread the tail and droop their wings as courtship display.

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Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/200sec   ISO-100  @600mm

I often get chance to photograph these little beauties and I call them my friends/sisters as I see them having their breakfast and singing. My husband has started calling me ‘bulbul ‘ so you may understand the relationship between bulbuls and I 😀

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Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/500sec   ISO-500  @600mm

While they fly, they display their white under parts and shades of brown and white through their wings. Currently they are my alarm clock. I love to wake up with their songs 🙂

 

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Exif:  f/6.3     exposure-1/320sec   ISO-500  @600mm

My gear- CANON + SIGMA

Location-Goa,India

So this is it for today’s birding session nature loving people. I hope you have gained some knowledge as I did while documenting all about Red Whiskered bulbul. I will see you all on next birding session. Till then happy birding. Be blessed.

Much Love,

Riya

 

Cabo De Rama Fortress, India 

“Everyone has their own perspective of seeing things. This is mine. “

Hello everyone, hope you are going through a mid-week crunch at work. Hence I am here to share something peaceful with you all.



You must have seen my last post regarding birding in Agonda backwaters in the south Goa. If you haven’t, here is the link ~

bird watching in Agonda backwaters 

Now that you know that I have had a weekend gateway in the serenity of South Goa in republic-weekend, I want to share another such spot in South Goa that you must visit with some time in your hand if you like peace, quiteness and tranquility. And that place would be Cabo-de-rama Fortress situated 16km away from Agonda Beach.

Disclaimer : This fort is one of my husband’s favorite. And we visited here  twice in 1 year being staying in proper north Goa. Hence, my this blog post is dedicated to him 😄

Now let’s get back to business. 

Cabo-de-rama Fort is the largest and one of the oldest forts in India with an outstanding coverage area of 180,000 square meters. It is believed that this fortress served as home to God Rama and his wife Sita during their 14-years of vanvas (exile) from Ayodhya.


This massive fortress was built by Hindu rulers but according to history, it has been passed on to Muslims to Portuguese hand to hand succeeding one another in battles over possessing this massive architectural beauty. This fortress has served many battles in the history of India. 

In 1763, Portuguese claimed the Fort with 21 canons, military barracks, commandant’s room and a chapel. Portuguese left the fort to be abandoned later. This fortress served as government prison from 1935 till 1955 but soon after it was abandoned again. 

Today, this fortress is one of the major tourist attractions of South Goa with a chapel of St. Antonio located on the territory of the fortress. 

From the top of the fortress, you have a glimpse of the magnificent Arabian Sea and Goan coast line all along. Trust me,its a beautiful pleasure to your eyes. 

This fort is just the ruins today of what our ancestors had in past. But yet it possess a charming personality that anyone with the eye can not ignore. 

Yes, it might be very tiring if you visit in one very warm day with raising sun above but only then you get clicks like this. (of course if you love your lens  😜) 

Walking by the ruins of this majestic beauty you will get the fresh air in intervals directly from the Arabian sea. 

Every one has their own perspective of seeing things. As I said earlier I have mine. I don’t know what is not attractive about this area. The small crusifics(holy crosses)  all over in the not so dense forest always catches my attention. 

While talking of perspection, I would like to add the way I look at the sea. Living in one of the biggest coastline of India and yet being in love with the ocean has obviously some story to tell. 

Change the way you look at things and life will be beautiful. Mark my words.. 

One more promise Goa serves you is that it never disappoints you. It has its own charm of seduction. 

Have a look at the most peaceful panaromic view before we let ourselves out of Cabo-de-rama fortress. 


If you are in Cabo-de-rama, and you do not visit the Cabo-de-rama Beach, that’s normal. But if you do not visit and eat at The Cape Goa it seems abnormal to me. 

This hotel cum restaurant serves the most amazing view of the Cabo-de-rama beach from its restaurant. Don’t believe me, look for yourself. 

The crystal water and the sweet air flow along with your favorite sea-food brunch. What else is needed anyways. 

Trust me and visit this place once while in goa but ofcourse with your own creative perspection. You will never be disappointed. 

This is my way of biding thank you to the mother nature. 

Thank you for reading. Have a great day. 

Much love

Riya

Agonda backwaters- bird watching in tranquility 

AGONDA – what would I say about this place. For most of the visitors and other normal people/tourists ( yes, I don’t mind calling myself abnormal being living in a society where most people looks at Goa as fun. Fun as in Beaches, Bikinis, Beer, and Blast), agonda is one of those boring beaches where crowd is less and water is blue with zero water sports. No disco light shacks where they play party songs all night. In short its poles apart from the beaches in North (mostly, as in baga calangute, vagator, etc.). And exactly that’s what it catched our attention when we visited this soul catching place last year. This year we wanted to make it happen again. Feel the water and soil. Listen to waves all day. That’s how we wanted to celebrate our 2nd anniversary. And ofcourse eat a lot. Like a lot. 😁

Yum Swiss breakfast 💛

We booked beach huts for 2 days in Agonda in the first long weekend of 2018. On the second day after lunch, we were strolling on the beach when this interesting boat captain met us. Like all the other boat riders, he tried to convince my husband for a happening boat ride to the beautiful butterfly beach OR to the serene backwaters where there is only one thing persists. PEACE. As soon as he uttered the word “bird watching”. This was it. I ran to my hut to bring my camera and we were on the boat the very next moment.

I had a great chat with Captain Nitesh who had avid knowledge about local birds and their habitats. I was so excited to meet a guy who was as excited to encounter a bird and name it as I always am 😊 He lived all his life in Agonda and read about the birds, their calls, their habitats. So now let’s begin birding.

Avidly seen bird of Goa.

Mr. White throated kingfisher. They mostly do fishing alone. It’s very rare to catch them in Pairs. You are lucky if you did 🙂

Common kingfisher with a fish kill

They are not that common in any area. I was excited to catch one with a catch.

Southern Coucal taking a beautiful perch.

Juvenile Brahminy kite resting. You can always see them flying over your head. But I always get mesmerized when I see them sitting.

Even more beautiful matured Brahminy kites. Their beauty can easily austruck you. Most beautiful kites with their decent colour.

I have had quite a lot encounters with Indian pond heron. But this was only the second with striated heron with blue and grey stripes.

Hence another shot.

My first encounter with Crimson backed sunbird after tons of purple rumped visitors to my home and office :D. Well! they are all the same. NAUGHTY

A bunch of common Myna’s jumping from one branch to another.

“If you want to photograph birds, you have to be a part of the silence.” And that’s what we experienced there. Extreme silence and bird calls. Beautiful it was!

It was almost the sunset when a couple of Parakeets flew from one leaf to another and got indulge in their job. 😂

No, we didn’t give them any privacy. Parrots are my husband’s favorite. And he snatches my cam when he sees one. He is so cute. Isn’t he? Hence this pic credit goes to him.

And we head back to the beach from tranquility as it was about to get dark. [UPSIDE DOWN PICTURE]

Bidding a beautiful good night with a ever more beautiful Black drongo.

(Double exposure)

There were tons of other bird species too that I was happy to encounter for the very first time and sad at the same time not being able to get a clear shot due to unavoidable circumstances that we were on a boat and they have the liberty to fly and sit anywhere they want.

Other species includes

  • Golden backed woodpecker (always busy pecking no matter how hard you try to get closer)
  • Indian paradise flycatcher( likes to perch in dark I guess. She wasn’t ready to come out at all)
  • Stock billed kingfisher ( flies really fast.. Like really)
  • Brown headed oriole
  • Red vented bulbul
  • Oriental Magpie Robin

And some common Goan birds like green bee eaters. I really missed the flycatcher and woodpecker this time. But next time, I would make sure I won’t…

That’s us with captain Nitesh 😎

Untill next time. Happy birding

You may also see Birding in Assonora, Goa

Or Birding from Home

Much love

Riya💚

I wish I had wings ~ Poetry

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to hold on my feelings
I could fly away
Far far away
Away from all the facility
Away from the word called ‘society’

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to answer every phone rings
I could reach the peak of a mountain
I could scream and burst the lava of anger in my fountain

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to follow the proceedings
I could vanish from the world I live in
To make my own space in the submarine

I wish I had wings
So to not let anyone know my doings
I would be on my own
Fighting through the trees and clouds
At least would be better than the fake smiles and humanly moulds

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to live inside buildings
I wouldn’t be anyone’s burden
I could make a living in a simple den

I wish I had wings
I could follow my emotional feelings
And listen to my heart
I could keep trying to reach the top
Doesn’t matter how many times I flop

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have any bindings
I could sit on any humps or horns
I wouldn’t had to face any real game of thrones

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to fake my choice of lovings.
I could choose not to wear leathers
And proudly show off my colorful feathers

I wish I had wings
No One had to listen to the songs my heart sings
I could decide what for me is best
And could make my very own cozy nest

I wish I had wings
I would have no permanent bondings
I could feel free, fly free
And my attitude towards life could be care-free

But.

I am not a flying beauty
I Have no wings
Anyone bothers or not
I have to burden my personal belongings

I wish I had wings
I wouldn’t have to hold on my feelings…

~Riya

Birding in Assonora, Goa

I just realized it’s been two weeks that I have updated about my birding activities. Please check out my last post on birding from home if you haven’t already 😊. In the last post, I posted about the birds that I saw or regularly see around my house area. Now this is the time for office area. 😂 It might sound funny, but I live in Goa, and there is a birding opportunity in every 500m. So here are few of my clicks that I could manage to take within 1 hour before the sun sets and get ready for another new day ☺️

First of all, I would like to tell you about the location a bit. This place is a par i.e. the flowing journey of backwaters from a dam. I cross this little bridge over the water everyday to reach my office. Here’s the soothing view.

I must tell you this is as refreshing as it seems in the picture.

Now let’s start birding. I spotted and captured 3 major birds in this area with few uncapturable others like common kingfisher etc.

Cattle Egret – Bubulcus ibis

Cattle egrets are quite a lot common in Goa. You can spot them near any water body and sometimes on road sides too.

A portrait is must while playing with one of them.

In search for kill.

Yay, I got one 😀

The landing

Great Cormorant –Phalacrocorax carbo

I hadn’t seen this black beauty before and hence was getting confused with black heron, may be from quite a distant view. I couldn’t wait and took the risk of going the closest possible to the pillars where they were resting.

One

Another one

One + one = Two ❤️

the eye contact”

Little egrets- Egretta garzetta

Hearing the name might be confusing for anyone to imagine these egrets to be little and small, but trust me, they aren’t AT ALL.

Little ones are the most beautiful and awestruck egrets I have ever seen. They stand tall like any queen of the forest.

Majestic beauty taking the leap

The attitude walk.

Finally “The final Closure”.

And they took the click of the day award 😀

The fly and the water

While I using busy chasing egrets, the sky was full of kites.

I won’t say one can spend hours and hours in this particular location because they can’t. But still it’s a spectacular point for a bird watcher/lover.

Overview: All together

It was going to be dark, hence I quickly snapped a few macros and took off for the day.

Oops I forgot, I was near flowing water body, how could I miss the chance of experimenting with shutter speed 😀 a little waterfall 👇

Don’t worry, just one shot now, let the remaining be in another detailed post.

Camera: Canon 1300D

Lens: Tamron 70-300mm handheld

That’s all for today’s birding. Stay connected till my next one.

Much love

Riya

Birding from home

Hello everyone, I am here to keep my promise I made in my last post about posting some bird pictures I clicked. So I am starting a series here of bird photography. But first of all, I should let you know that I am not any expert and far far from being professional in any kind of photography. Just to take my hobby a step ahead, I started this blog to keep me and you all motivated.

For birding, the basic amenities we require is a minimum 500mm lens and a better pair of tripod which is quite heavy on my budget. Hence I am using Tamron 70-300mm telephoto lens with CANON 1300D. Though I have simpex 333 tripod, I usually do bird photography handheld because of course, they have wings and I can’t move my tripod with their speed 😂

So let’s start with today’s post, Birding from my home (balcony-2nd floor, terrace or downstairs). I live in Goa and my house is located in quite a Hilly place and I am just lucky enough to have a big bunch of trees just at my backyard, not reachable but visible from my bedroom balcony 😍

” Birds wake me up every morning with their chirping”

So let’s start with the very first bird I clicked after shifting here.

Greater coucal. This image is very special for me as I started my journey with this. I haven’t seen a bird that beautiful before sitting at home. So few more from the same species.

Lesser coucal

Southern coucal.

This was yesterday. He was playing hide and seek with me 😉

Finally got what he had come for.

Moving on to the next one.

Purple rumped sunbird – male

Purple rumped sunbird – female

A black drongo visited me for the first time yesterday. Happy me. 🙂

White throated kingfisher is the most vividly seen in Goa due to their distinctive colours. I simply adore this bird.

Oriental magpie Robin.

Sorry for the bad quality image. 😦

Red whiskered bulbul

I am singing my lungs out, can you hear me?

Some unexpected catches from home👇

Chestnut tailed startling.

I was so happy to see this bird with a bunch of other species jumping from one branch to another.

I simply loved the frame to crop off a little..

Indian Pond heron.

After I see this bird for the first time that closely on my building boundary, I happen to see it everywhere where there is a water body.

Thanks for the surprise visit and giving me time to capture your poses.

Why not crow?

House crow.

Crows are boring to shoot as they are most common in any Indian region, so I pair them with sunset 🙂

And sunrise.

Morning time coupling:)

Talking about birding from home, I hereby want to add two more birds which I clicked while from home in Bareilly, UP when I was at my In-laws house this October 🙂

Eurasian collared dove.

Mostly confused with house pegion, being very common in that area..

Portrait of the same

Rufous Treepie

No they are not sparrows. 🙂

So that’s it for today people. I will continue my ‘series on bird photography’ every now and then. Till then, let me know if you liked my clicks or not. Your comments are really appreciated.

Much love,

Riya

Dr Salim Ali bird sanctuary

Hello everyone, Today i.e. 12th November 2017 is the 121st birth Anniversary of the person who is famously called the ‘Birdman of India’. Only due to his dedication and systematic bird surveys across India, Ornithology has its place today’s India.

Being a padma bhushan and padma vibhushan awardee, sir Sálim Moizuddin Abdul Ali is a hero for many Indian birders /bird watchers.

Today, my post is dedicated to him.

This post is about the Salim Ali bird Sanctuary in Goa and few of the birds that I captured in my lenses around my neighbourhood.

Lets start with the place which told me about this legend for the very first time. Yes I didn’t know about him, as I was never that of a bird watcher (always loved the wings though in the open sky). But only when I came to Goa and started waking up to bird chirps, I have grown this keen interest in them. I cant say, how much I love watching their activities and trust me I can do that all day 🙂

Lets start with Dr Salim Ali bird Sanctuary, that is situated on the Chorao Island in North Goa district along the mandovi river.

As soon as you deboard the rivander-chorao ferry, you will find this sanctuary just to your left.

This is the entrance path.

As soon as you enter this place, serenity will attack you from everywhere.

Walking paths has been beautifully carved helping birders and tourists to make their way.

These beautiful yet strong stone pallets will take you closer to what-we-call Peace.

Not sure what these are. Could be find everywhere in the mud. I took this capture as they formed animal figures to me 🙂

I also see myself as I grow up – says the tree

Beautiful stretch of rich flora and fauna can be seen here along with the various kinds of bird calls. I wish I had a better lense when I went to this place last time. Unfortunately couldn’t spot any of those eye catching wings.

No wonder I want to visit this place again and again. Next time I am here, you bloggers will be with me 🙂 I am such a jungle person.

You can see the happiness index 😀

I am sun’s alarm clock~says the bird

Serenity and calmness is what your mind finds in such places. Find some time for your soul and visit these nature bound places, not just to find birds but to find yourself 🙂

These are my best frames that could describe the peaceful attitude of this location.

A far away click of the Brahmini kite 🙂

Stay with me till my next post which will include my bird spotting activities in Goa. *Promise*

Till then,keep smiling and keep birding:)

Much love,

Riya

Diwali 2017

I know it’s been two weeks since Diwali but finally I get to sit with my blog just now. And I am so happy and in peace. So lets get started.

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This year, we went to Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh to celebrate Diwali with our sweetest family. So lets start with my family that I got after marrying my husband 🙂

Without family, celebration is not celebration.

Hence its the festival of lights, diyas, rangolis and night, I got ample of opportunities to try out different combinations of manual settings. On the Diwali eve, I played with the depth-of-field a bit.

Though it’s not perfect 😦

#Bokeh

Light in night.

Be the unique you.

These were the ones I had to satisfy myself this time. Now let’s move on to the Diwali night. *Diyas* rangolis *and ofcourse*click click*

We made this rangoli at mom’s mandir.

T-light candles on quilled candle holder made by my SIL. I loved how it turned out as a center table decor.

Now allow me to introduce my model, my rangoli and craft partner (whenever we meet), miss fun, my sweet sister-in-law.

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Finally a day Pic. 😀

Completed rangoli using candles and bangles 🙂

When we both were in home, we had to have a photoshoot with fairy lights. Loved playing with it. || High brightness recommended for better view ||

*Enjoy * and give me feedback. It will help me to improve.No headband, no issues 🙂

Follow your light, and see yourself shining:)

If you have to, get lost in yourself 🙂

Smile and the world smiles with you.

* Hazy but cute *

This was it for today. Hope you liked it. Don’t forget to share your lovely thoughts. Once again belated

Much love

Riya

Egret

Hello everyone, I am a bird girl and a big fan of birds. Though not yet a birder but always keen to capture and know about each and every bird I come across. Today’s chapter is on Great Egrets that I found in Goa.

An egret is any of several herons, most of which are white and several of which develop milky white fine plumes during the breeding. The breeding season of these egrets varies with local conditions. One brood is raised in a year. The nest is a wide platform with a shallow for eggs and hatchlings. Both the egret parents incubate the eggs and feed the hatchlings.

Their super milkeish body is a refreshment to the eyes. They have black or red legs with long necks (one and half times as long as their own body).

They hunt and live in both saltwater and freshwater marshes . Hence can be found near any of their favorite water bodies.

The Egrets feed on fish, frogs, small reptiles, small birds, rodents, insects and muluscs (basically whatever available near water bodies)

I found some of these while visiting Aldona village in North Goa. I loved how charmful they are. The way they takes off just took my breath for a while.

I didn’t waste a second, and quickly captured some of these beauties act in my Tamron 300 mm lense.

Have a look at these beauties and do leave a comment if you like them.

A beautiful great egret showing off her beauty.

Just flew off as we land. They are mostly seen in small groups for feeding.

And this one’s my favorite. Always pleasure to see them in pair.

Egrets are largely found in Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia and Australia.

Do cherish their beauty for a minute if you happen to see them.

Thank you

Riya